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Mmm… strawberries…

Where do they come from?

It would appear that the strawberry originated in Asia, Europe and America. Strawberries were spread by birds carrying the small berry loaded with tiny seeds over long distances. Our Neolithic ancestors consumed it 1,000 years BC and the Romans cultivated it in their gardens. However, it was only in the fifteenth century that the strawberry was first cultivated for commercial purposes. Starting in the sixteenth century, behind the protective walls of botanical gardens, we cultivated the plants of a larger strawberry of a darker red (F. virginiana) brought back by explorers.

However, it was only 200 years later that its cultivation actually spread after it was crossbred with another kind of strawberry (F. chiloensis) from America. Amédée-François Frézier, a French spy, discovered it. From the union of these two plants, a new species was created that still accounts for the bulk of the world's strawberry production today. It’s called F. x ananassa (strawberry pineapple) because the flavour of the fruit is similar to the flavour of pineapple.

 

 

On the nutritional side

This tasty fruit is characterized by its vitamin C content. In fact, a ½ cup of strawberries (about 7 strawberries) is equal to 85% of our daily recommended intake of vitamin C.

 

Did you know?

Strawberries aren’t fruit… in a botanical sense anyway! In fact, the fleshy part that tastes so good is actually the flower stalk which swells after fertilization. The small yellow seeds covering the surface is the real fruit! 

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